Why am I Being Audited?

You just received notification that your business has been selected for a Texas Comptroller state tax examination. Unless you have been through the audit process before, you probably have lots of questions and concerns. Of course one of the first questions most business owners ask is, “Why my business?” Although it’s common to think you did something wrong, this usually isn’t the case. However, if you have been selected for audit, Texas Tax Group has a team of 15 former Texas Comptroller State Tax Auditors who can help you save time and money. (more…)

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Franchise Tax Account Status

The Comptroller has historically issued Certificates of Account Status (“good standing”) in response to inquiries about the status of an entity’s franchise tax account. The ability to search the franchise tax status of an entity is also available on the Comptroller’s public website, Window on State Government.

In the past, being “in good standing,” or being able to obtain a Certificate of Account Status, meant that all franchise tax filing requirements had been met and no franchise tax was due. (more…)

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Future Roundtable Discussion on Cost of Goods Sold and the Printing Industry

The Tax Policy Division will hold a roundtable discussion regarding the cost of goods sold deduction and the printing industry. A date has not been set for the roundtable, but we are looking at the month of June.

If you would like to be involved in the development of our future policies in this area by attending the roundtable meeting, please email Teresa Bostick.

*Originally published in Tax Policy News; a monthly newsletter about Texas tax policy at http://www.window.state.tx.us/taxinfo/taxpnw/tpn2013/tpn1304.html#issue2.

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Franchise Tax – Rule 3.588

The Tax Policy Division recently hosted a roundtable discussion on Rule 3.588 related to margin and the costs of goods sold. The roundtable discussion was based on a draft rule amendment that was sent to representatives of various businesses who had participated in a work group on the issue of qualifying labor costs for Cost of Goods Sold. The amendment has not been formally proposed in the Texas Register.

We’ll be holding more roundtables to allow interested people to have input in the rules we propose, and we’ll keep you informed of upcoming events through this newsletter.

*Originally published in Tax Policy News; a monthly newsletter about Texas tax policy at http://www.window.state.tx.us/taxinfo/taxpnw/tpn2013/tpn1302.html#roundtable.

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“Good Standing” Account Status – Changes Are Coming

Businesses have been reporting under the revised franchise tax since 2008. Due largely to the complications of combined reporting, companies can be “not in good standing” due to a reporting error, not a tax delinquency. A “not in good standing” status can be costly to a company conducting a business or financial transaction.

The Comptroller took another look at good standing in the light of concerns from businesses. The result of that review is that being “in good standing” for franchise tax will mean that the company’s right to transact business in Texas is intact.

Being in good standing has evolved over the years, as we made changes to accommodate processing times and filing requirement changes. There are also different types of good standing, and this office may not be able to issue a certificate under certain good standing conditions. In short, it’s become complicated.

The decision to simplify and update the franchise tax good standing status definition was based on several factors:

  • Fairness. The good standing calculation is done by the certificate of account status application in real time. If a report processes that is missing a schedule, for example, the website will show the company to be “not in good standing” immediately – even before the company has been notified of the problem.
  • Transparency. The term “good standing” is misleading in that it addresses only franchise tax, although a company in good standing could have liabilities in multiple other taxes.
  • Clarity. A good standing can be confused with a certificate of existence, which is issued by the Secretary of State and attests to the status of an entity’s registration in Texas.

What’s Next?

A project team is looking at the procedural and programming changes necessary to replace good standing with the status of the entity’s right to transact business in Texas. See Texas Tax Code 171.251 – 171.259. This new definition means that a business will receive a written notice of any issues with its franchise tax filing, and will have at least 45 days to cure those issues, before the business is not in good standing.

*Originally published in Tax Policy News; a monthly newsletter about Texas tax policy at http://www.window.state.tx.us/taxinfo/taxpnw/tpn2013/tpn1301.html#issue1.

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